National Volunteer Week- Karl Lam

crop person touch palms with newborn baby on gray backdrop

Karl, a web designer and father to a child with Rett Syndrome connected with RSSBC after his child was diagnosed. He offered up his skill set to help develop a new website, promoting not only the society but to help get resources and information to families and supporters in a timely and efficient manner. Karl spent a year creating and building the new Rett Syndrome BC website. He continues blessing RSSBC with his skill set and meets regularly with the team to ensure the website continues to run effectively and has current information. Thank you so much for all you do Karl! We are forever grateful.

National Volunteer Week- Alice Wang

Alice has been volunteering with RSSBC since the summer of 2020. She was instrumental in our Rett Syndrome awareness campaign in October. She tirelessly contacted every mayor/city in which a person with Rett Syndrome lived in BC, asking for a light-up event and/or proclamation. It was because of her efforts that we had 10 locations light up around BC and received 15 proclamations. She also wrote feature stories about those with Rett Syndrome that were posted to our social media outlets in October which was seen by over four and half thousand people. Alice’s self-driven personality has been a huge assist and we look forward to continuing to work with her. 

National Volunteer Week- Leigh Anne Stitt

Entrepreneur, Leigh Anne Stitt has been volunteering with RSSBC for two years. She reached out to RSSBC after her niece was diagnosed. She wanted to help not only her niece and family but others like them. Leigh Anne accepted the Vice President position and has been a huge assist to the society. Leigh Anne brings a large company business background that has benefited the society time and time again.
Thank you, we are forever indebted to you, Leigh Anne.

National Volunteer Week- Rachel Kwong

High school student, Rachel Kwong has been volunteering with RSSBC since August 2020. Rachel has been working on perfecting RSSBC’s new website. Each week she looks at the website and ensures that it is current, appealing, and easy for all to use. Without Rachel, RSSBC would not be able to keep our community informed and up to date. Thank you for all you do Rachel! 

National Volunteer Week- Tiffany Wai

UBC student, Tiffany Wai has been a volunteer with  R.S.S.B.C. for just over a year now. She contacted the society in 2020 just after the pandemic first hit. She was looking for a way to apply her skill that would serve our community. Throughout the year she took on multiple roles such as social media marketing and newsletter writer and later became secretary on the board. 

Tiffany has been a huge asset to the RSSBC team and all the families that we serve. 

Thank you Tiffany!

National Volunteer Week

The Value of One, The Power of Many, reflects on the awe-inspiring acts of kindness by millions of individuals AND the magic that happens when we work together towards a common purpose. Therefore RSSBC will be showcasing one amazing volunteer per day throughout the week describing how their efforts have impacted RSSBC and the families we serve. 

Keep up to date by following our Instagram account at @
rett_syndrome_bc

Easter Tips

Here is Day 4 of our Easter Survival Tips! We would like to remind you that every child is different and unique and responds to stimuli in different ways. Here is what worked for us!

Finally, plan ahead. You know your child better than anyone, so anticipate trouble spots before they happen. Pack a busy bag for church, seat your child far away from a well-meaning relative who’ll try and force unfamiliar foods on him, or pair your kiddo up with an understanding cousin who’ll help her navigate the kids’ table. Then relax and enjoy making memories with your family!

Keep up to date by following our Instagram account @rett_syndrome_bc

Easter Tips

Here is Day 3 of our Easter Survival Tips! We would like to remind you that every child is different and unique and responds to stimuli in different ways. Here is what worked for us!

Go candy-free. Children with special needs often have some sort of food restriction. Eliminate the issue by filling your Easter eggs with toys instead. Consider fidget toys, bubbles, Silly Putty, pencil grips, novelty erasers, toy cars, ear buds, balls, money, and Lego figurines. If you’re giving a treat to a child on a special diet, be sure to run any food items by mom and dad first to make sure it’s not on the restricted list.

Keep up to date by following our Instagram account @rett_syndrome_bc

Easter Tips

Here is Day 2 of our Easter Survival Tips! We would like to remind you that every child is different and unique and responds to stimuli in different ways. Here is what worked for us!

Adapt your Easter Egg hunt. No one is less happy than a kid with an empty basket at the end of an Easter egg hunt. While it may be tempting to hover nearby and help your child find his eggs, there are ways to adapt your hunt so he can be successful on his own. The first step is to lay out the rules: Everyone stops after finding X number of eggs, which gives slower children more time to look for their eggs without fear of them all being found. Or try assigning each child their own colour to find. Talking eggs give an additional auditory clue and are also great for kids with visual impairments. One of my favourite home visit activities this time of year is an egg hunt inside a sensory bin (usually rice). Because it’s one-on-one, each child has as much time as they want to find their eggs and it’s an activity that is easily adapted to each child’s needs.

Keep up to date by following our Instagram account @rett_syndrome_bc

Easter Tips

Here is Day 1 of our Easter Survival Tips! We would like to remind you that every child is different and unique and responds to stimuli in different ways. Here is what worked for us!

Put down that Easter bonnet. The adorable smocking on that fancy Easter dress or the stiff dress shirt and tie might feel a little itchy to a typical child, but to a child with sensory issues who over-registers sensations, it could very well be unbearable. You might be able to compromise by letting her wear a favourite t-shirt underneath or letting him wear his Superman socks. But if not, you might just have to let it go. If you just can’t bear to let her wear her beloved sweatpants today, at least pick out an outfit that’s soft and comfortable. Make it special by choosing holiday colours or adding holiday accessories.

Keep up to date by following our Instagram account @rett_syndrome_bc